social.mjd.id.au


Oh wow, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Return_from_Witch_Mountain is older than me?? It feels less outdated than that.
Hong Kong or Sweden
Loved those when I was a kid, Disney had a brief run in the '70s of really good SF/horror movies for kids that weren't condescending. Everything they did before or since was junk.
@Digital Mark ☕ 🍎 λ TOOT In the end we watched Honey, I Shrunk the Kids and it has stood the test of time extremely well.

The kid is very picky with pacing, effects and other things that send a *lot* of 90s and even 00s movies down the drain, but this 1989 movie was a real hit.

May all your buses leave just as late as you need them to and not a minute later.

May The Goddess smile upon your irregular morning habits.

#
Hong Kong or Sweden

Embracing the power of the wood dowels.
#
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Trying to do the Shinto thing and building the whole composting toilet without using any sort of nail or screw.
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How do you remove the dowel if you need to remove it for repair?
doesn’t that require mastery to do well?
How do you handle a composting toilet on a boat? I also want one but the logistics seem... complex.

drawn while at the precipice of overstimulation
# #
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Libera Chat mastodon (AP)
We're introducing a nickname expiration policy change to help free up some disused nicks a bit faster than usual. It's called the "two week two hour" rule and it will start being enforced at 12 noon UTC this Friday (25th); see more here https://git.io/JnDzg

If you have used your account at any point later than 2h after registration, this policy change does not affect your account or any grouped nicks.
Jonn mastodon (AP)
what about GROUP?
Libera Chat mastodon (AP)
this policy doesn't target grouped nicks on accounts that are otherwise ok.

If you have _ever_ used your account after it was more than 2h old, your account and grouped nicks will never fall under this policy.
Free Pietje mastodon (AP)
I was just about to copy the contents of https://github.com/Libera-Chat/libera-chat.github.io/commit/cf52115#commitcomment-52513840 as the initial message was quite unclear imo and looking at the commit replies, I wasn't the only one.

What you said above *is* very clear 👍
Libera Chat mastodon (AP)
turns out raw policy diffs with no context are not a good format for communication, we'll be blogging with more detail and examples for stuff like this in the future.
~kline
Cambria mastodon (AP)
good reminder to actually get back on IRC and chat with folks vs having a nick that never gets used. (guilty)

The company that made our bathroom mat has the slogan "Focus on mat manufacturing".

Makes you kind of curious, doesn't it? What kinds of diversions did they indulge themselves in that prompted this?
Hong Kong or Sweden
They once got sidetracked into towels. A temptation barely avoided.

Most tech # are frustratingly incapable of predicting the future, and 2006's # 2.0 is no exception. But it holds up better than many, and identifies four key # themes still relevant today: # - by states, and by code - competing #, and latent ambiguity.
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Next book is "Thinking in Systems", by Donella H. Meadows, because eventually I'll have to back up all my mutterings about "self-reinforcing behaviors".
The cover  the book, "thinking in systems".
Next book is "Winning the Green New Deal: Why We Must, How We Can", edited by Varshini Prakash and Guido Girgenti of the Sunrise Movement. A collection of essays by environmentalists and policy folks.
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"Is it just human nature that hold us back, then? In fact, we humans have shown ourselves willing to collectively sacrifice in the face of threats many times, most famously in the embrace of rationing, #, and victory bonds during World Wars I and II."
"Indeed, to support fuel conservation during World War II, pleasure driving was virtually eliminated in the UK, and between 1938 and 1944, use of public transit went up by 87% in the US and by 97% in Canada. Twenty million US households - representing three-fifths of the population - were growing # in 1943, and they accounted for 42% of the fresh vegetables consumed that year. Interestingly, all of these activities together dramatically reduce carbon emissions."

#
In his book, "Merge Left: Fusing Race and Class, Winning Elections, and Saving America", Ian Haney López compared two economically populist narratives with a nationally representative sample of 2,000:

"To make life better for the working people we need to cut taxes, reduce regulations, and get government out of the way."

and

"To make life better for working people we need to invest in education, create better-paying jobs, and make health care more affordable for people struggling to make ends meet."
"The progressive message beat the unrestrained-capitalism message by a whopping 32 points. This result confirms that voters generally prefer progressive over pro-business economic policies." However, the study found that messages that relied on racial fear were more effective. So the developed and tested a counterveilling core narrative:
"(1) distrust greedy elites sowing division, (2) join together across racial lines, and (3) demand that government work for all racial groups, whites included. These elements provided the scoffolding on which we built nine diffeerent messages. The race-class sotry they told proved remarkably powerful." - Studies found that the majority of the represeanttive sample found it compelling.
Bill McKibbon - "As it turned out, the big fossil fuel companies had known well before Hansen what was happening. They'd begun a serious study of global warming in the 1970s, as supercomputers began to become fast enough to model the clinate. #, for example, was in those days the biggest company on earth, with a crack staff of scientists, and its *product was #.*"
"([Exxon's] predictions have proven startlingly accurate, with carbon levels today basically in line with their graphs.) And they were believed by their bosses: # began building its drilling rigs higher to compensate for the rise in sea level they knew was on the way."

😱 That's... astounding. They knew that the seas would rise, and their response was to hide this fact and protect their assets? How can anyone think that unregulated business is safe?

#
Rhiana Gunn-Wright says the pillars "problem, principles, and power... anchor policymaking from conception to execution."
"When it comes to climate change, you will hear people support (or refute) certain policies because it's what 'science dictates.' Science can help us to understand the extent of the climate crisis, identify its causes, and measure its severity. It can even suffrage timelines for action. But science cannot tell us what policy options to pursue. That is a matter of principles."
"If you cut your teeth in policymaking anytime in the past forty years of American politics, you've been surrounded by neoliberal theory presenting itself as 'common sense'."

Yes! It reminds me of the point made in "Inventing the Future", how # itself unseated the reigning ideology of Keynsian economics. Every dominating paradigm is "common sense" until it is displaced.

https://mastodon.technology/@Argus/100023401750279622
My next read is Paradise Lost by John Milton.
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Next read is "Concrete Economics" by Stephen S. Cohen and J. Bradford DeLong.

First book from the # reading list.
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"Inspired", by Marty Cagan. Gonna read me a book on product management.

# # #
Book cover: inspired by Marty Cagan
I finished "The Power" by Naomi Alderman today.

I didn't enjoy the read, but it was thought provoking. The central thesis of the book seemed to be, "our society is based on power, and if women were stronger than men we would see the same oppressive dynamics we see now, reversed."

That's a grim thought.

# # #
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Next book is The Entrepreneurial State, by Mariana Mazzucato.

I'm going to try not to overdo it with the social notes. It's a library book due back soon, and I'm not sure writing down everything helps me absorb the content.

Still, I'm excited to dive into another # book.
Cover of "the entrepreneurial state"
This pretty little number is my next read, the Verso Book of Dissent.

Thanks to @mayel for the recommendation. I think I have a different edition, but it still looks good.

#
Picture of a book cover.
I didn't realize when i bought it that the book was written 2006, but I'm still pretty interested to read "Producing Open Source Software," by Karl Fogel.

I just joined an # software company and I have a lot to learn.
Book cover for the text listed in the post.
Next read: I've got the audiobook of Margaret Atwood's "The Testaments". Figured I'd intersperse the heavy stuff with *some* fiction.

# #
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Next (current) read: if Beale Street Could Talk, by James Baldwin
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Just finished the Tombs of Atuan by #. The whole thing, cover to cover, on #. The Internet rules.
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Next read: Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley
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Next read: "Just Enough Research" by Erika Hall
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The book starts with a story of how the author, a #*, femme-presenting non-binary person, is typically stopped and searched at the airport because her body "deviates" from the pattern expected by the millimeter scan.

This is an example how "larger systems - including norms, values, and assumptions - are encoded in and reproduced through the design of sociotechnical systems."

Strap in.
Arturo Escobar sees # as an "ethical praxis for world-making."
How can one develop an ethical, inclusive design process from a continent away and no opportunities for in-person interaction? No observation, no participatory design.
"People experience and resort # on three levels: the level of personal biography; the group or community level of the cultural context created by race, class, and gender; and the systemic level of social institutions. Black # thoughts emphasizes all three levels as sites of domination and as potential sites of #." - Patricia Hill Collins
"More broadly, # allocation has always been an algorithm, one designed according to the political priorities of power holders. It's an algorithm that has long privileged whiteness, hetero- and cis-normativity, wealth, and higher socioeconomic status."

#
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"Yet [#] remain niche services, used by ony a relatively tiny group of professionalized campaigners. They typcially cost money to use, often based on the number of ocntacts in the campaign database, and they require a significant investment of time and energy to learn. They will in all likelihood never be widely adopted by the vast majority of people who participate in social movements."

# #
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"Instead, most people, including social movement #, organizers, and participants, use the most popular corporate social network sites and hosted services as tools to advance our goals. We work within the addordances of these sites and work around their limitations. We do this even when these tools are a poor fit for the specific task at hand, and even when their use exposes movement participants to a range of real harms."

# in a nutshell.
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"Why do the most popular # platforms provide such limited affordances for the important work of community organizing and movement building? Why is the time, energy, and brilliance of so many designers, software devlopers, product managers, and others who work on platforms focused on optimizing our digital world to capture and monetize our attention, over other potential goals (e.g. maximizing civic engagement, making environmentally sustainable choices, buiding empathy ... ?)"
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"Put another way, why do we continue to design technologies that reporduce existing systems of power # when it is so clear to so many that we urgently need to dismantle those systems?"
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"'The Design of Everyday Things' is a canonical # text. It's full of useful insights and compelling examples. However, it almost entirely ignores race, class, gender, disability, and other axes of #. Norman very briefly states that capialism has shaped the design of objects, but says it in passing and never relates it to the key concepts of the book. Race and racism appear nowehere. He uses the term "women" only once..."
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"Norman describes the problems designers face in designing for left-handed people and urges ths reader to 'consider the special problems of the aged and infirm, the handicapped, the blind or near-blind, the deaf or hard of hearing, the very short or very tall, or the foreign.'"
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"He thus firmly subscribes to the individual/medical model of disability that locates # in 'defective' bodies and as a problem' to be solved, rather than the social/relational model (that recognizes how society actively disables people with physical or psychological differencces, functional limitations, or impairments through unnecessary exclusion, rather than taking action to meet their access needs)..."
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"..., let alone the disability justice model, created by Disabled B/I/PoC as they fight to dismante able-bodied supremacy as a key axis of power within the #."
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"In other words, the book is a compendium of designed objects that are difficult to use that provides key principes for better design, but it almost entirely ignores questions of how #, #, #, #, and other aspects of the matrix of domination shape and constrain access to affordances. # is an approach that asks us to focus sustained attention on thes questions, benning with "how does the matrix of domination shape afforance perceptibility and availability?"
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
This is just the worst. If I quote every important thing in this book I'm going to type out the whole damn thing.
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"An object's affordances are never equally *perceptible* to all, and never equally *availabe* to all; a given affordance is always more perceptible, more available, or both, to some kinds of people. # brings this insight to the fore and calls for designers' ongoing attention to the ways these differences are shaped by the matrix of domination."
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"Most designers, most of the time, do not think of themselves as sexists, racist, homophobic, xenophobic, Islamophobic, ableist, or settler-colonialist. Some may consider themselves to be capitalist, but few identify as part of the ruling class. Many feel themselves to be in tension with #, and many even identify as socialist. However, # is not about intentionality; it is about process and outcomes."
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"# asks whether the affordances of a designed object or system disproportionately reduce opportunities for already oppressed groups of people while enhancing the life opportunities of dominant groups, independently of whether designers intend this outcome."
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"As Chemaly notes: 'The underlying design assumption behind many of these errors is that girls and women are not 'normal' human beings in their own right. Rather, they are perceived as defective, sick, more needy, or 'wrong sized,' versions of men and boys. When it comes to #, male-centeredness isn't just annoying --- it results in very real needs being ignored, erased, or classified as 'extra' or unecessary...'"
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"'...To give another, more tangible example, one advance artificaial heart was design to fit 86% of men's chest cavities, but only 20% of women's... the device's French maniifacturer Carmat explained that the company had no plans to develop a more female-friendly model as it 'would entaill significant investment and resources over multiple years.'"

#
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"What's more, although design that discriminates based on race and/or gender is often seen as problematic, social norms under # do support systems design that intentionaly reproduces class-based discrimination. For example, the intended purpose of a predictive algorithm used by the credit industry to determine home loan eligibility is to afford the loan officer a heightened ability to descriminate between those who are likely to be able to make loan payments..."
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"...Such a tool, by definition, promotes class-based discrimination, and when it does so, it is seen to be doing its job. However, when it disiriminates based on a single-axis characteristic (race OR gender OR disability) that is explicitly protected by the law, then it is said to be biased."

# #
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"In preexisting bias, bias that exists in a broader society, culture, and/or institutions is reproduced in the computer system, either intentionally or unintentionally, by systems developers. For example, graphical user interfaces typically embody a preexisting bias against vision-impaired people because the designers do not consider their existence at all, not because they consciously decide to exlude them."
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"In technical bias, some underlying aspect of the technology reproduces bias; for example, the poor management of optical sensors on darker-skinned people."
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"In emergent bias, a system that may not have been biased given its original context shifts or when new users arrive -- for example, Tay, the Microsoft chatboot that was trained to be sexist and racist by Twitter users."
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"[Value-sensitive design] does not believe that most designers are intentionally racist, sexist, or malicious. Instead, this approach emphasizes that many mechanisms that introduce unintentional bias are at play. These include "unmarked" end users, biased assumptions, universalist benchmarks, lack of bias testing, limited feedback loops, and, most recently, the used of systematically biased data sets to train # using # techniques.
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"After ... # began to leave [#] for startup competitor #, Facebook implemented some modifications to its real name flagging and dispute process and instituted a new set of options for users to display gender pronouns and gender identity, as well as more fine-grained control over who is able to see these changes. However, as scholar ... Anna Lauren Hoffman notes, the diverse gender options only apply to display; on the back end, Facebook still codes users as male or female."
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"In large part due to the efforts of # activists, an approach known as # (UD) has gained reach and impact over the last three decates. UD emphasizes that the objects, places, and systems we design must be accessible to the widest possible set of potential users."
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"In the 1990s, the Center for # at North Carolina State University defined UD as 'the design of products and environments to be usable by all people to the greatest extent possible, without the need for adaptation or specialized design.'"
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"UD discourse emphasizes that we should try to design for everybody and that by including those who are often excluded from design considerations, we can make objects, places, and systems that ultimately function better for all people. # shares that goal, but also acknowledges both that some people are always advantaged and other disadvantaged by any given design, and that this distribution is influenced by intersecting structures of race, gender, and disability."
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"Instead of masking this reality, design justice practicioners seek to make it explicit: we prioritize design work that shifts advantages to those who are currently systematically disadvantaged within the matrix of domination."

I guess this is the difference between # and #? Equality of access vs designing a system to equalize outcomes.
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"One group that has worked steadily to advance design practice that is not univeralizing is the Inclusive Design Resarch Centre (IDRC). IDRC defines # as follows: "design that considers the ful range of human diversity with respect ot ability, language, culture, gender, age and other forms of human difference."
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"...this group also sees disability as socially constructed and relational, rather than as a binary property (disabled or not) that adheres to an individual. Disabiity is 'a mismatch between the needs of the individual and the design of the product, system, or service. With this framing, disability can be experienced by anyone excluded by the design... Accessibility is therefore the ability of the design or system to match thre requirements of the individual."
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"[#-ers] call for "one size fits one" solutions over "one size fits all" [but]acknowledge that "segregated solutions" are technically and economically unsustainable. They argue that, at least in the digital domain, adaptive design that enables personalization and flexible configuration of shared core objects, tools, platforms, and systems provides a path out of the tension between the diverse needs of individual users and the economic advantages of the large-scale user base."
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"Yet the idea that we need to retool is sure to meet with great resistance. Physicist and philosopher of sciece Thomas # famousy described how each scientific paradigm develops along with a widely deployed and highly specialized apparatus of experimentation, testing, and observation. These fixed costs reduce the likelihood of paradigm shift, absent a growing crisis where the current paradigm is unable to effectively account for discrepancies with the observed world."
#Kuhn
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"As Kuhn remarks: 'As in manufacture, so in science - retooling is an extravagance to be reserved for the occasion that demands it.' As in manufacturing and science, so in #: an intersectional critique of the ways that current... practices systematically reproduce the matrix of domination ultimately requires not only more diverse design teams, community accountability, and control... but also a retooling of the methods that shape so many... domains under the current universalist paradigm."
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"Is it always (or ever) possible to reduce # for all users simultaneously? Perhaps not. Instead, designers constantly make choices about which users to privilege and which will have to do more work. # decisions distribute higher and lower cognitive loads among different kinds of people. The point is not htat it's wrong to privilege some users over others; the point is that those decisions need to be made explicit."
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"Empirical studeis support a strong critique of the ideas that the same design is "best" for all users. For example, Reinecke and Bernstein found that most users preferred a user nterface customized according to cultural differences. They note that it is not possible to design a single interface that appeals to all users; they argue instead for the design of 'culturally adaptive systems'."
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"Racial hierarchies can only be dismantled by actively # systems design, not by pretending they don't exist."
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"We must ask questions such as this: within any decision-making system, what ditribution of benefits do we believe is just?"
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"Beyond inclusion and fairness in #, we need to consider justice, autonomy, and sovereignty. For example, how does AI reproduce colonial ontology and epistimology? What would algorithmic decision making look like if it were design to support, extend, and amplify # knowledge and/or practices? In this direction, there is a growing set of scholars interested in # technologies, including AI systems."
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)


"In this direction, there is a growing set of scholars interested in # technologies, including AI systems. For example, designers Lewis, Arista, Pechawis, and Kite draw from #, #, and # knowledge to argue that # epistemologies, which tend to emphasize relationality and 'are much better at respectfully accomodating the non-human' should ground the development of #."

https://jods.mitpress.mit.edu/pub/lewis-arista-pechawis-kite/release/1
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"[Arturo Escobar] insists on attention to what he calls the ontological dimension of #: all design reproduces certain ways of being, knowing, and doing. He's interested in the # concept of creating "a world where many worlds fit," rather than the "one world" project of # globalization."
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"Happily, research centers, think tanks, and initiaves that focus on questions of #, fairness, bias, discrimination, and even decolonization of data, algorithmic decision support systems, and computing systems are now popping up like mushrooms all over the world. As I mention in this book's introduction, these include Data and Society, the AI Now Institutte, and the Digital Equity Lab in New York City, the New Data Justice Lab in Cardiff, and the Public Data Lab."
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"Coding Rights leb by hacker, lawyer, and feminist Joana Varon, works across Latin America to make complex issues of data and human rights much more accessible for broader publics, engage in policy debates, and help produce consent culture for the digital environment. They do this through projects like Chupadados ("the data sucker")."
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"Other groups include Fair Algorithms, the Data Active group the Center for Civic Media at MIT; the Digital Justice Lab, recently launched by Nasma Ahmed in Toronto; Building Consentful Tech, by the design studio And Also Too in Toronto; the Our Data Bodies Project; and the FemTechNet network."
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"If you have come here to help me, you are wasting your time. But if you have come because your liberation is bound up with mine, then let us work together." - Lilla Watson, Australian Aboriginal activist and artist
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"# inequality systematically structures paid # work. Professional design jobs in nearly all fields are disproportionately allocated to people who occupy highly privileged locations in the #. At the same time, numerous expert designers and technologists who are not wealthy and/or educationally privilieged white cis men have often been ignored, their labor appropriated, and their stories erased from the history of technology."
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"White and Asian cis men dominate technology jobs. For example, in the United States, women overall hold 26% of #, Black women hold just 3 percent of computer programming jobs, and latinas hold 2%. As feminist media anthropologist Christina Dunbar-Hester notes, gender disparity in the software industry is far worse within the supposedly "open" arena of free/libre and # software...: just 2% of # developers are women, compared with 30% who work on proprietary software.
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"# (UCD) refers to a design process that is 'based upon an explicit understanding of users, tasks, and evnironments; it is driven and refined by user-centered evaluation; and addresses the whole user experience... over time, UCD has become ther recommended design approach within many firms, government bodies, and other institutions."
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"However, UCD faces a paradox; it prioritizes 'real-world users.' Yet if, for broader reasons of structural inequality, the universe of real-world users falls within a limited range compare to the full breadth of potential users, then UCD reproduces exclusion by centering their needs. Put another way, # always involves centering the desires and needs of some users over others. The choice of which users are at the center of any given UCD process is political.."
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"In addition, designers tend to unconsciously default to imagined users who experiences are similar to their own. This means that users are most often assumed to be members of the dominant, and hence 'unmarked' group: in the United States, this means (cis) male, white, heterosexual, 'able-bodied', literate, college educated, not a young child and not elderly, with broadband internet access, with a smartphone, and so on.'
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"# can be useful tools for communicating project goals, both within teams and firms and to other actors, including funders, investors, the press, and other users. There is some evidence that personas help designers stay focused on the the intended use case... however, there is no systematic study that I was able to locate that examines whether the use of diverse user personas produces less descriminatory design outcomes."
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"Don Norman, one of the most important figures in [UCD]notes that in UCD, 'the designer expects the users model to be identitical to the design model. But the designer does not talk directly with the user -- all communication takes place though the system image.'"
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"If you're not at the table, you're on the menu. # does not focus on developing systems to abstract the knowledge, wisdom, and lived experience of community members who are supposed to be the end users of a product. Instead design justice practicitioners focus on trying to ensure that community members are actually included in a meaningful ways throughout the # process."
gws mastodon (AP)
If you're not a keyboard shortcut, you're on the menu.
@gws @Derek Caelin in the good old days the keyboard shortcuts were on the menu and the shortcut prominently advertised there
Next book is "City at World's End" by Edmond Hamilton, a 1950s # book hosted on #.

Thus far, it's classic 1950s fare. A square-jawed team of white man scientists are flung into the far future along with their town. The local government is weak, the women are frail and must be protected.

For all that the premise is interesting - reminds me of "The Night Land" and "The City and the Stars" - post post post apocalypse cities surviving on doomed worlds.
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Next read is "The Buried Giant," by Kazuo Ishiguro.

Post-Aurthurian legend where nobody can form long term memories.
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I enjoyed "Catherine the Great" by Robert K. Massie
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Next read is Andrew Krivak's "The Bear". A father- daughter post-apocalypse tale.
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Next book: Dan Brown's "Practical # Discovery"
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Next Read is "Kiss The Ground" by Josh Tickell.

I started a job in October trying to help farmers (and other people living on the land) practice #. We've got to store that # and save the world.
Book cover.
Next Read: The Little Book of Investing in Nature.
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More of an essay than a book, but my next read is "Making Kin with the Machines" by Jason Edward Lewis, Noelani Arista, Archer Pechawis, and Suzanne Kite. https://jods.mitpress.mit.edu/pub/lewis-arista-pechawis-kite/release/1

# #
two people face each other. The brain of one looks like an engine, the other appears to be a lilly.
Next book is "Let It Rot!: The Gardener's Guide to Composting" by Stu Campbell.
Picture of a book
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
Yay! Excited to get into "All We Can Save" by @ayanaeliza and Katherine K. Wilkinson

# # # #
Picture of a book cover
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
Next read, this time with the kiddo. "We Are The Water Protectors"

Beautiful illustrations. The right story.
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Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
The #, #, and # Working Group (EDIWG) at #, published a white paper called "Ethical Exploration and the Role of Planetary Protection in Disrupting Colonial Practices" and it calls for incorporating # practices as we explore other worlds. https://arxiv.org/abs/2010.08344
a report cover
I read Kiss the Ground (and other # literature) and I get so angry. As a species we're sinking into climate destruction and still, the world's largest # countries (looking at you, #) can't take dramatic action. Only 53% of the country thinks # is major problem; only 49% think humans have something to do with it. This is the struggle of our time and, collectively, we're asleep.
https://www.pewresearch.org/science/2020/09/29/concern-over-climate-and-the-environment-predominates-among-these-publics/
I like this author's method of starting each chapter of his nonfiction book in the first-person present tense.
" [David]explains that the per acre yield or corn has skyrocketed since his grandfather's day. His granddad was lucky to get around thirty or forty bushels per acre. In contrast, today in the noisy combine 'we' harvested around 150 bushels per acre - and some of thr farmers he knows are pulling in up to 180."
"When asked about the inputs and the investment needed to squeeze that kind of productivity from the ligand, David they've all gone up too. Farm chemistry can get complicated but the basic roles of application, he says, are simple. The more dry weight of corn (or soy beans) you want, the more pounds of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium you add. But along more inputs only works up to a point which is called your 'maximum yield' (MY)." # #
"And gauging exactly where that point is so you don't spend unnecessary money on inputs? Well, says David, that's somewhere between a 'scientific guess' and a 'lot of prayin.'"
"He explains that the band numbers for application break down as follows. To grow an acre of corn today you apply around 140 pounds of ammonium nitrate (nitrogen), around sixty of phosphate (phosphorus), and around eighty pounds of potash (potassium). Added to that are about two to three points power acre of herbicides (like glyphosate, the primary chemical Roundup), insecticides, and/or fungicides."
"America loses about two farms every hour, twenty-four hours a day, 365 days a year."
"In other words, the great efficiency of modern # now makes it possible for every 1 farmer to feed 317 nonfarmers. It's really a miracle."
"The first barrier to unlimited acres of the same crop was pests, the second weeds, and the third fungus. Without balanced soils, which have inside them all the microbial life needed to support plants, nature will cull a crop. In naturue, diversity is the norm, not the exception, so an ecosystem in a systate of unbalance (too much of the same plant) will, through bugs, weeds, plant disease, et cetera, attempt to restore itself to balance (diversity)."

# #
This book is fantastic. I know the barest outlines of U.S. agricultural history, and "Kiss the Ground" tells it with humor, drama, and loads and loads of concrete facts. I'm really getting a lot out of it, and it's not a slog to get through.
Oh my god. Look at this 1947 ad in Life magazine for the Pennsylvania Salt Manufacturing company.
An add with a dog, an apple, a woman, a cow, a potato, and a chicken all singing "DDT is good for me-e-e!"
"The data suggests [pesticides]are in up to 98 percent of food. Sometimes it's in small doses, someimes large. The USDA, the agency responsible for testing our food, does not test for the majority of the worst offenders of these poisons (including 2,4-D, glyphosate, or atrazine) in the foods on which they are mostly sprayed (corn, soy, and wheat)."
"Washington, DC's 'revolving door' between big agricultural businesses, the regulatory agencies, and the Senate and House committees that are supposed to oversee them leaves little in the way of citizen protection from these chemicals. With nobody to shield them, Americans are the guinea pigs in the largest chemical experiment humankid has ever taken."
"Not surprisingly, up to 67 percent of the premiums for crop insurance are paid to private comapanies directly from the federal government. If that all sounds like mumbo jumbo, the bottom line is that private enterprise is soaking up most of the tax money that is supposed to be paid to farmers, who, due to an overbearing and outdated government finance scheme, grow the very crops that make Americans sick."
"The system of crop insurance works like this: RA releases its policy listing crop insurance prices. Based on the list of insured crops a farmer decides what they will grow. A farmer then certifies his or her production by making sure it conforms to the government mode. After harvest there's an acreage report. If, as is often the case, the crop produces less than the expected per acre quanity set by the governent, the farmer files a loss report."
"The insurance is calculated and the premium is paid by the federal government (mostly to a private company). The farmer receives his or her "loss payment" and starts again."
"... a Farmer must adhere to the federal insurance program's strict guidelines concerning the type of crop to be planted (i.e. patented seed), the methods used (i.e., chemicals sprayed), as well as where and when the crops are grown. Not surprisingly, farmers generally grow the crops with the highest per acre insurance rates ... Because it provies a guaranteed price for crops, the federal crop insurance program tells the majority of ... farmers what to grow and what not to grow."
"While it maintains one sort of food security, in its current incarnation the government crop insurance penalizes farmers who do the right thing when it comes to soil. Based in Washington, DC, where the average Senate seat costs around $10 million and where there are over one thousand lobbyists for every member of Congress, the FCIC is in lockstep with the major companies that profit and benefit from industrialized corn and soy and the chemicals and machines they require."
"In 2009, the the midsize # - those grossing between $100,000 and $250,00 - averaged a net income of approximately $19,270, incuding government payments. Even those operations designated by the # as "large industrial farms" (making a gross income of between $250,000 and $500,000 in 2009) netted only $52,000 on average, including $17,000 in government payments."

# #
"A 2015 University of Illinois Department of Agriculutal and Consumer Economics (ACE) budget projection puts the net farmer income in 2016 for corn at negative $66 and soybeans at negative $97, respectively. Meaning, frowing corn will result in a loss of $66 per acre and soy will lose you $97 per acre. The ... recommendation? Cut costs by $100 per acre. Then at least you could make $3 an acre... In other words, the *only way* to make any money on these crops is with government [subsidies]..."
"With incomes like these, it's no surprise that farmers are leaving the land in droves. According to Farm Aid, 330 American farmers leave their land for good every week."

Content warning: description of suicide trends

"Farmers in the commodity game of 'grow more with smaller margins' will find the tightrope they walk is getting more tenuous. Six companies now control 75% of the grain-handling facilities, forming a virtual 'sextopoly'... As in the days of old, this virutal monopoly of companies sets the price of grain, and # have to accept it."
"Nutritional density is a difficult thing to access over time, but studies put the loss of # in fruits and vegetables over the past sixty years at anywhere between 5 and 40 percent. Meanwhile, the size of our vegetables, grains, and protein sources has ballooned. This is called the 'dilution effect', whereby we eat more calories but receive less by the way of bioavailable nutrients."
"# has been linked to tainted drinking water supplies, earthquakes, and extreme environmental degradation. But hydraulic fracturing is the only way America can produce enough natural gas to sustain the fatories that make synthetic # (ammonium nitrate). And without that synthetic nitrogen, more than 90 percent of the # grown in America would fail."
"More bad news: most synthetic nitrogen applied on farm fields in the United States is not going into crops. Recent studies put nitrogen uptake by crops at about 30 percent. This means that 70 percent of what is applied either goes into the atmospher or into water. Hence, 'two-thirds of the US drinking supply is contaminated or high levels with carciongenic nitrates or nitrites, almost all excessive use synthetic nitrogen #."
"As the city of De Moines, Iowa, has learned, synthetic nitrogen poisons water supplies. As Fishermen in the Gulf of Mexico and other river delta areas are learning, nitrogen-rich agriculture runoff creates an anoxic environment that kills life. The waters affect by poisonous levels of nitrogen are called dead zones because the majority of the food chain is killed."
"Over two-thirds of the Earth is desertifying."
Global map circling places on continents where the Earth is desertifying.
"...In the middle of # is the Central Valley, a 60,000-square-mile, mostly flat piece of open arid land that has been cleared of its former # in order to perform large-scale #. A small fraction of it is covered in plants and water (if we're being generous, say 10 percent). The remainder (say 90 percent) is bare, hardened, mostly unplanted dirt and reflective urban/suburban surfaces."
"During the day it reflects heat into the atmosphere and obsorbs heat, baking like a massive frying pan. All the while [the heat] is pushing clouds and rain away. Meanwhile its soils are eroding, which means food growers require ever more water. Now add to this manmade desertification the occurence of season after season of # assisted heat waves."
#CO2
"In contrast, the former ecosystem of the Central Valley, a mixed oak forest with redwoods to the north and bushland savanna to the south, held most of its water in its soils. In natural forest ecosystems soil organic matter (SOM, aka "organic matter") is anywhere from 3 to 7 percent. For each 1 percent of organic matter, an acre of ground will hold around 25,000 gallons of water in its soils."
"So before man practiced agriculture in #, the soil was likely holding around 100,000 gallons of water per acre. Growing on top of that soil was a mixture of vegetation types, all of which pulled CO2 from the atmosphere and pumped it into the ground where the microbes used that carbon to buid the very pore spaces that stored water inside the soil. This is the ecosystem we removed."
" In a twist of fate, we humans 'reverse terraformed" our planet from a web of balanced, interlocking, lush ecosystems into larger and vaster deserts."

#
Oh thank God. I think i'm finally passed the "we're screwed if we don't do something" phase and into the "here's how you can save the world" phase of this book.
Picture of the first page of a chapter, "meet the regenetarians"
Saving these! Livestock on the go do less damage to the soil than livestock kept in one place, and are healthier to boot.

# #
Image/photo
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"All natural," "free range," "made with love," ... do not have a certification program. There is no set of standards for them. "All natural" applies as equally to motor oil as it does to potatoes. "Free range" can mean that chickens are grown in factory farmhouses with locked doors.

The USDA Organic label is not perfect by any stretch of the imagination, but it is the only # food label that is backed by inspectors, standards, and a strict government program."
"[The USDA Organic label] is the only government-backed standard that lays the groundwork for #.

To receive the USDA Organic label a farmer must not use genetically modified organism (GMOs), must not use sewage sludge on his or her fields, and must not feed his or her livestock plastic pellets, urea, manure, and 'slaughter by-products.'"
"Instead, the farmer must: be certified through a qualied agent, have an organic system pan including crop monitoring, keep detailed records of all inputs and sales, create land zones around the crops, rotate the crops, use organic seedlings or seeds, feed livestock only organic feed, provide livestock and poultry with living conditions that allow "natural behavior," including outdoor access, fresh air, sunlight, and space to exercise, and provide pasture access for cows."

#
"There's a push to make the practice of # farming better, so much better in fact that # amy one day mean that food isn't just free from hormones and chemicals, but that it's actually healing the soil and reversing #."

#
"These # # are the key to life as we know it. Human life would not exist without mycorrhizal fungi. We would still be in an aquatic environment without [them]. It doesn't mean that there wouldn't be a Planet Earth, it just means that we wouldn't be here." - Dr Kristine Nichols

"She says that through RNA analysis scientists have been able to determine that an ancient ancestor to [mycorrhizal fungi] was the thing that helped algae move from pools of murkey water onto land."
"...[#] fungi are the things that can transport and provide for up to 90 percent of the nitrogen and phosphorus needs of a crop plant."
"In many ways, # is an ideal fertilizer. It's balanced for the soil, it is rich with beneficial microbes, and it helps soil hold up to twice as much moisture. When applied to the #, the microbes in compost go to work like probiotics, helping to establish that rich humus layer of #."
"Collecting and composting all the food scraps and yard trimmings in the entire country every day of the year would produce enough compost to cover about 2 million acres with a quarter inch of compost. This is a significat area, but it is only about 0.5 percent of our agricultural soils. To make a lasting impact onour soils we would need more compost - lots more #."

Content warning: description of death and compost

Content warning: description of death and compost

Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
It's been a month an a half since had to return "Kiss the Ground", request it again, and wait for it to be returned. So, here we go, picking it up again!
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"You see, it takes nature about five hundred years to bbuild on inch of topsoil. But the United States is losing soil ten times faster than the natural replenishment rate. (China and India are losing # thirty to forty times faster.)"

Natural processes, yes - but humans can generate much faster, if we put our minds to it. Compost + Manure + Topsoil
Image/photo
#soil
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"Homesteading families [in Kansas the 1860s] found themselves in "tallgrass prairies" with grasses as high as six feet. According to the #'s History Explorer, 'It is said that riders on horseback could pick wildflowers without dismounting.' Imagine # covered in six feet of tallgrass!"

The latest episode of "How to Save a Planet" (https://gimletmedia.com/shows/howtosaveaplanet/j4hzjwz/party-like-its-2035) reflects on how transitioning to # and # energy will take dramatic changes to the landscape - something we've done before!
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"In essence, running a plow over soil and 'breaking' the soil, the very thing that man has been doing in agriculture since the dawn of human civilization, destroys the # matter (which contains life-giving carbon and microorganisms). Put more simply, # (aka plowing) makes the # canabalize itself."
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"The more complex version of the story...is that tilling exposes certain strains of bacteria to the oxygen in the atmosphere. Once these little critters have access to air, they binge-eat the organic matter in the soil. They oxidize... the organic matter off, stripping out the stable, #-laden molecules and releasing substantial quantities of # into the atomosphere. This is the opposite of #."
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
I also appreciate how this chapter describes how # is not the same thing as # #. One can employ organic processes, but till the soil (to combat weeds). This will end up harming the soil by compacting it and activating the carbon-eating bacteria.
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"As Ray points out, tilage creates a self-perpetuating cycle. As you till, you kill soil life, which then destroys the glues that make soil porous, which means that the soil can't absorb water, which means it needs to be tilled to add "air", which creates erosion, and so on. In other words, the more you till, the more you need to till."
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
Organic soil holds more water.
Image/photo
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
Rad - here's multispecies combo to mimic a natural ecosystem, fix nutrients in the soil, and grow plants.
Image/photo
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"'Look at the facts," [Gabe Brown] says. 'The average corn production in Burleigh County, North Dakota, is just under 100 bushels per acre. My proven yield on our farm is 127 so I'm producing twenty-five percent more than the average in this area and I'm not using # s., and I'm not using all the fertilizers, pesticides, fungicides, et cetera. So why do we need it? Why do they need the drought-tolerant gene in corn? Because they've destroyed the soil and they now have continuous drought.'"
#GMO
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"'Just because a product is # does not mean that it's nutrient-dense.'"
Derek Caelin mastodon (AP)
"As Gabe puts it, the big issue is not whether or not to be certified "organic," but rather whether or not to till the soil. 'One of the things I wrestle with personally every day is do we till or do we spray an herbicide?", says Gabe. "I have a desire to be # #. We can do it on a very small scale, a vegetable garden, etc. But to my knowledge, there's no large-scale operation in the world that's no-till organic and here's why: Nature wants the soil to be covered all the time."
bhaugen mastodon (AP)
These folks have been experimenting with no-till organics on some scale. Not North Dakota farm scale, but some parts of a 950-acre farm.
https://www.meadowlarkorganics.com/

We get beans and flour from them.

My cousin does no-till in North Dakota the Roundup way...which is how most no-till gets done.
@bhaugen @Derek Caelin Is there a path from tilled farming to non-tilled farming? Just perseverance and years of bad yield or is there some shortcut?

>> # now just open discussion of white supremacy, ops doing nothing to stop it and refusing to answer questions about whether tolerating it is policy

> people are asking many questions about our policy that are answered by our silence about our policy.
https://nitter.exonip.de/tobermatt/status/1407118963343908864
Hong Kong or Sweden

@Adrian Cochrane I wouldn't call it type-checking, but yeah, Lisp is kind of a Forth with reverse reverse Polish notation and parentheses to denote the reversion and enforce stack balance. =)
In particular PicoLisp feels rather Forthy inside. I can't quite explain why I feel that, but I had that feeling right from the beginning when I read about it.

Don't like Brussels sprouts? Try deep frying them. Had these with a vegan belachan, lemon, chilli and coriander sauce. #
Image/photo
R E K mastodon (AP)
I am a super fan of brussel sprouts :D! This looks delicious, and a reminder to go pick some up at the grocery today ^_^.
(They're also very good braised).
James Chip mastodon (AP)
Yes to braised sprouts! I loooove them,but my wife is not a fan.
whtrbt mastodon (AP)
do you fry on the boat? seems to messy for me, oil spatters, etc.
R E K mastodon (AP)
Rarely. I agree, it is too damn messy. I do like to make tempura once in a while tho, but it's been a while :>.

Progress, progress... It's gonna be a pretty website once I'm done. #
A redesign page of my website, with nice fonts, spacing and images.
The merit goes to @atari who designed everything. 🎨

"Socialists who promote socialism using esoteric leftist jargon that ordinary people don’t understand aren’t really interested in promoting socialism. It’s just a nerdy hobby for them. They’re the same as Star Trek nerds speaking Klingon." # Caitlin Johnstone https://caityjohnstone.medium.com/nationwide-dementiafest-notes-from-the-edge-of-the-narrative-matrix-1712ddb5e949
#q
Ruben friendica
so true

First time generating sounds from the Uxn implementation of Orca! The sounds are coming from Uxn's built-in synthesizer, 4 channels playing basic waveforms.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nNC8ar5PdKI&feature=youtu.be
cancel mastodon (AP)
remember when this was a javascript program that did everything with strings and made multiple copies and passes over the data
Devine Lu Linvega reshared this.
Feels like lifetimes away now.
The uxn port code is much more similar to the orca-c code in that it uses macro for nearly all port operations.
rezmason mastodon (AP)
I can't believe how far it's come 😃

Karol Belina mastodon (AP)
inspired by the emacs uxntal mode by xaderfos, i started making a vim plugin

i like how with syntax highlighting it immediately becomes clear what's an instruction, an address, or a macro
Image/photo
Devine Lu Linvega reshared this.
I like to differentiate READ/WRITE operations, it helps a lot with finding errors.
Image/photo
Image/photo
Karol Belina mastodon (AP)
oh that's a lovely idea, i should have looked at the sublime syntax file first

Today's Twitter threads (a Twitter thread):

Inside: No health care for part-time TSA screeners, Akil Augustine on Radicalized, Wendell Potter rebuts Joe Biden, best Covid-19 explainer and more!

Archived at https://pluralistic.net/2020/03/12/boeing-crashes/

#

1/
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If you've got a monster kid in your life, please consider pre-ordering POESY THE MONSTER SLAYER, my first picture book, out on July 14!

https://twitter.com/doctorow/status/1228033537867014145

2/
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TSA boss doubles down on taking away health care from part-time screeners: They're touching your junk with diseased hands.

https://twitter.com/doctorow/status/1237780644022767616

3/
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Akil Augustine on Radicalized: My book's Canada Reads champion lays out the case for Radicalized.

https://twitter.com/doctorow/status/1237781455670890496

4/
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A former top Cigna exec rebuts Joe Biden's healthcare FUD: Wendell Potter is the prodigal corporate villain.

https://twitter.com/doctorow/status/1238086195067777024

5/
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Ars Technica's Covid-19 explainer is the best resource on the pandemic: Beth Mole has outdone herself.

https://twitter.com/doctorow/status/1238091148654067713

6/
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Boeing is even worse at financial engineering than they are at aircraft engineering: The $43B they incinerated through stock buybacks would sure come in handy about now.

https://twitter.com/doctorow/status/1238094624637370368

7/
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Senate Republicans kill emergency sick leave during pandemic: Sick leave is cheaper than pandemics, but pandemics generate cost-plus contracts for the donor class.

https://twitter.com/doctorow/status/1238098182753538052

8/
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The EU's new Right to Repair rules finally come for electronics: Snooks cocked at Apple and other US Big Tech monopolists.

https://twitter.com/doctorow/status/1238112113261858816

9/
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How to run a virtual classroom: Masterclass from the 14-year-old Stanford Online High School.

https://twitter.com/doctorow/status/1238124055078686725

10/
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# Leaked UK record industry memo sets out plans for breaking copyright https://craphound.com/BPDigitalEconomyBillweeklyminutes.pdf

# Portland cops charge homeless woman with theft for charging her phone https://news.streetroots.org/2015/03/06/homeless-phone-charging-thief-wanted-security

11/
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# How Harper's "anti-terror" bill ends privacy in Canada http://www.michaelgeist.ca/2015/03/why-the-anti-terrorism-bill-is-really-an-anti-privacy-bill-bill-c-51s-evisceration-of-government-privacy/

# RIP, Terry Pratchett https://web.archive.org/web/20150312202353/http://www.pjsmprints.com/

# Security researcher reveals grotesque vulnerabilities in "Yelp-for-MAGA" app and its snowflake owner calls in the FBI

12/
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Yesterday's threads: Saturated fat and obesity, which foods produce satiety, spying VPNs, Twitter's research-friendly terms of service and more!

https://twitter.com/doctorow/status/1237779446741889024

13/
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These threads are archived daily on http://Pluralistic.net, my tracker-free, ad-free, cruft-free blog.

Here's today's: https://pluralistic.net/2020/03/12/boeing-crashes/

14/
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I'm also posting these to the fediverse (apols for today's double posts! beware of falling rocks!). Here's today's:

https://mamot.fr/@doctorow/103810893997528840

15/
It's also a daily newsletter, the plura-list, which you can sign up for here: https://pluralistic.net/plura-list

It's ad-free, tracker-free and plain text. My sole nod to adornment is a single daily emoji. Today's is "🎲". I welcome your suggestions for future emojis.

16/
Hey, Hugo nominators, my novella Unauthorized Bread is up on Ars Technica!

https://arstechnica.com/gaming/2020/01/unauthorized-bread-a-near-future-tale-of-refugees-and-sinister-iot-appliances/

(it's also shortlisted for Canada's national book prize, Canada Reads; it's being made into a TV show by Topic & a graphic novel with Firstsecond)

17/
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City life..

some idiot has decided to block the fire escape with an unwanted piece of exercise machinery.
Treadmill/running machine left on stairs blocking fire escape
they have been back and stuck a piece of paper on it saying "Will move it by Friday"

WTF! lol
Tim mastodon (AP)
FFS!

Leonie (Koyu) got a # server! Cool! Who wants to play? :D
you have to be whitelisted though
GMate8 mastodon (AP)
:(

Uncle Reaton mastodon (AP)
The front page is really neat!
thanks! took me a few hours of design work
Kevyn Oliveira mastodon (AP)
poggers

Danny O'B mastodon (AP)
Nearly 10 years on, and avoiding people you don't like (and still liking the people you do) is still the pressing problem of social software: https://www.oblomovka.com/wp/2011/09/10/rss-died-for-your-sins/

Got a blog post coming today… 👀
Okay maybe tomorrow 😅

Youpi ! On a réussi ! 🚶 🚴 🌻 🌳 🚴‍♀️ 🚶‍♀️ ☀️
# # # # # # #
Impasse donnant accès à une école, avec une barrière portant un panneau "Entrée et sortie d'école. accès interdit de 7h30 à 9h15 et de 16h à 18h30 sauf vélo et PMR"
radis noir mastodon (AP)
Devant l'école, on s'est souvent dit que si c'était permis, certains parents iraient en voiture jusque dans la classe.

Une collectivité locale autrichienne en a fait un spot vidéo 😊
@mastobikes
# # # # :no_car2:

Traduction ⬇️

https://invidious.048596.xyz//watch?v=OtBEnyXBgeo&dark_mode=true&autoplay=0
radis noir mastodon (AP)
"Tout le monde veut le meilleur pour son enfant"
" - Pense à mettre tes chaussons pour le sport parce que le sol est froid et je ne veux pas que tu t'enrhumes"
"Le meilleur pour nos enfants, c'est moins de voitures devant les écoles.
Pour plus d'autonomie et de sécurité sur le chemin de l'école"
Même chose pour aller au supermarché ou voter.
@mastobikes

Content warning: musings


matsol mastodon (AP)
@neauoire I'm adapting your tracking system to my needs. I'm wondering what code would you assign to activity like reading a technical book to implement a project? Do you track auxiliary activities that contribute to a project indirectly?
The journal file only tracks creative outputs, not inputs. You might want to add an extra code equivalent to inputs.
https://wiki.xxiivv.com/site/horaire.html
matsol mastodon (AP)
I see, thank you

.. ⬛⬛⬛⬛⬛
⬛🟥🟥🟥🟥🟥⬛
⬛⬛⬛⬛⬛🟥🟥⬛⬛
⬛🟦🟦🟦🟦⬛🟥⬛🟥⬛
⬛🟦🟦🟦⬛🟥🟥⬛🟥⬛
‍‌‍‌‍‌‍‌‍‌‍‌‌‍‍‍‍‌‍⬛⬛⬛⬛🟥🟥🟥⬛🟥⬛
⬛🟥🟥🟥🟥🟥🟥⬛🟥⬛
⬛🟥🟥🟥🟥🟥🟥⬛🟥⬛
⬛🟥🟥🟥🟥🟥🟥⬛⬛
⬛🟥🟥⬛ ⬛🟥🟥⬛
⬛🟥🟥⬛ ⬛🟥🟥⬛
⬛⬛⬛⬛ ⬛⬛⬛⬛

Cool kicks, cool tights! #
A purple dolphin thinking about a grilled sandwich.


Only 5 operators to implement in Orca.. The 5 most intricate ones(U,G,Q,R,Z).
Only 2 operators to implement in Orca.. (G & Q).

I spend my days programming in a language I created and I couldn't be happier.

https://git.sr.ht/~rabbits/orca-toy/tree/master/item/orca.tal
Ah, that’s my problem. All of the languages *I* create are bad.
Well I felt that way about Uxn at first, but it has really grown on me. Have you tried writing extensive programs with your languages?
Not really, other than a support lib.

Hmmm. Maybe I should take a stab at it.
Michael9 mastodon (AP)
"...in a language I created" ...working tools for music making (and other types of creation) that you invented. 😎
Currently at a size of 9.5kb --
sejo mastodon (AP)
amazing! :moar:
Implemented all the basic operators of the OrcaVM in the UxnVM. :mac:

Time to write a uxn synth operator.
easrng mastodon (AP)
It's turtle^Wvms all the way down